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Racing cyclists nearly 18 (UPI) -- For the second time in three months sanitation crews in New York helped recover missing wedding rings from a local dump. Vicky Salzone, 58, awoke one morning to realize her three diamond wedding rings had gone missing while she was putting away Christmas decorations, CBS New York reported . "They were missing. I have no recollection of taking them off," the West Babylon resident said. "It was horrible, because I knew that they were irreplaceable." Her husband, 57-year-old Joe Salzone, awoke after hearing the garbage truck outside and called the local sanitation department. "I had had a dream when I heard the garbage trucks outside, I had this feeling that I should stop them because something is wrong," he told Newsday . "I called the town and said 'I think my wife's rings are in the garbage.'" Ed Wiggins, sanitation site crew leader, answered the call and recalled a similar incident in November in which Colleen Dyckman, 48, of North Babylon, found her wedding rings among piles of garbage. Wiggins was skeptical that the crew would be able to pull off another amazing find, as most items that make their way to the dump remain lost. "I said, 'You know, what's the odds of us really doing this two times in a row,'" he said. Wiggins and his team had developed a system for uncovering missing items and after locating the truck dropped small portions of garbage to help Salzone identify which bags were his. "Within 20 minutes, I found the bag from my house," he said.

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At 2:30 p.m., fellow Cottonwood resident Barbara Higgins posted a link to a news report from December 12, 2012, that featured the story of Kim Jones of Acworth, Ga. A Nashville native, Jones had her wedding dress preserved at White Way Cleaners following her October 25, 1986, nuptials at Forest Hills Baptist Church. Like McNamara, Jones had unsealed her dress to share a special moment with her daughter only to discover that it was not her dress. Both dresses were candlelight in colour and had similar beading and applique. The 2012 Tennessean article reported, Kim Jones imagines another mom out there who also may be frantically searching for her wedding dress for her own daughter or might not even know that she, too, has the wrong dress under her bed or in her closet. How right she was. With the help of social media, a story that took over four years to develop was resolved in a matter of hours. A mutual friend recognized the woman in the article as the mother-in-law of Sarah Jones, who coincidentally had also grown up in the Cottonwood subdivision. She tagged Jones in the post, who confirmed that this was her mother-in-law. It was Sarah Joneshusband, Cory Jones, whod initiated the call to The Tennessean in 2012 to help his mother find her dress. After the Facebook confirmation, Sarah Jones immediately called her mother-in-law, Weve found your dress! Kim Jones was taken aback. At her first opportunity she viewed the post on Facebook and confirmed that, indeed, her long-lost wedding dress had been found.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/world/how-facebook-fixed-crazy-wedding-dress-mix-up/ar-AAmaChT?li=BBqdmGR